Union Catalogue of Manuscripts from the Islamicate World

MS. Marsh 537 (Bodleian Library, Oxford University)

Oriental Manuscripts Marsh Collection

Contents

Summary of Contents: The volume consists of 227 folios and 5 preliminary leaves. Folios 2−226 were written by the same copyist and on the same type of paper and consist of twenty-eight numbered quires of eight folios each (except the first quire of seven folios and some disturbance in the two middle quires). Traces of Arabic numerals are visible in the upper left corners of some of the quires; on the lower left-hand corners upper-case letters of the Roman alphabet have been written, in sequence, beginning with folio 9 (labelled B). The letter S occurs on the quire beginning with folio 130, T on folios 138a and then again on folio 146a, V on folio 148a, X on folio 154a, Y on folios 162a, and Z on folio 170a. Thereafter, the alphabet repeats, with each letter given in both upper case and lower case (‘Aa’on folio 178; ‘Ff’ on folio 218). There are seven later owners’s notes (names not legible) and couplets written on folio 2a. Folio 2b is blank. The upper half of folio 3a has been defaced; the label Kitāb fī al-ṭibb has been written on it in brown ink, and on the lower half of the folio miscellaneous medical notes have been added by the same hand as added paragraphs to other folios within the treatise. Folio 227a (with horizontal laidlines and chain lines in groups of 3s) has two recipes: one for ulceration taken from Quṭb Shīrāzī [= Quṭb al-Dīn al-Shīrāzī who died in 710/1311] and an eye remedy ‘belonging to the West’ (shiyāf lil-gharb) said to be from the Aqraādhīn of one Filānīsī (فلانيسي). On folio 227b there are even more casually written recipes, several for maʿjūns. Folio 1 is not a part of the original set of quires labelled with Latin letters. Folio 1 is of different paper (no visible laid or chain lines) and was at one time folded; folio 1a has later notes in five different hands written at various angles, including an Arabic note stating the number of leaves to be 225, a Latin notation of subject, a Persian couplet, and a recipe that is repeated in a different hand on the facing folio (preliminary folio vb). Folio 1b has eight recipes written in very casual hands, includng one taken from the Minhāj al-dukkān (written in 658/1260 by al-Kūhīn al-ʿAṭṭār al-Hārūnī al-Isrāʾīlī (fl. 658/1260). On preliminary folio vb a piece of paper similar to that of folio 1 has been pasted on. The five preliminary leaves (front endpapers) are of watermarked paper (shield and the letter JC). On preliminary folio iiia the number from the Golius Sale Cat. is recorded as well as the number N. 229 and the catalogue number as in UAM; there is also a Latin label from a spine, probably on the volume before rebinding in the nineteenth century, now pasted onto folio iiia, and a note by Steinschneider written in 1852 identifying the author, incorrectly, as Ibn el Talmid. The remaining preliminary folios are blank.
1. ff. 2-141v
Incipit: بسم الله ... ثقتى بالله إن اولى ما نطق به اللسان وثبت برهانه فى الجنان الحمد لمدبر الازمان الذى اوجد المخلوقات بقدرته ... فلما راى العبد انامه الزاهرة ومناقبه الباهرة احبّ ان يصنف لمولاه كتابا طبيا مختصرا مغنيا فى معرفة الامراض واسبابها وعلاماتها ومداواته
Explicit: وعالج المريض بعلاج المبرسمين وبهذا العلاج يعالج من سقى الجند بيذستر. وعلاج من سقى البنج القى وشرب طبيخ التين . /تم الكتاب والله ولىّ الحساب/ وحسبنا الله وحده وصلى الله على/ سيدنا محمد النبى واله وسلم/

The copy is unsigned and undated, but appears to be possibly from the seventh/thirteenth century. It is a complete copy of the treatise. Tables are employed throughout the copy.

Dimensions 22.1 × 15.2 (text area 18.6 × 11.3) cm; 22−23 lines per page. The title is given in full on the title page (folio 2a) as al-Mughnī fī tadbīr al-amrāḍ wa-maʿrifat al-ʿilal wa-al-aʿrāḍ, where the author is given as: تصنيف الشيخ الجليل الفيلسوف ابو الحسين [كذا] سعيد بن هبة الله بن الحسين الطبيب قدس الله روحه

The treatise has been collated; collation notes occur frequently throughout the text (e.g. folios 8a, 15a, 102b). The copy has been extensively annotated in several hands, including Persian annotations; on folio 12b there is a marginal note in a careful hand written in brown ink quoting Galen (d. c. AD 216), on folio 26b citing Abū ʿImrān (al-Qurṭūbī, Maimonides, d. 601/1204), on folio 46a Ibn al-Tilmīdh (d. 549/1154 or 560/1165), and on folio 82a Yuḥannā ibn [. . .] (= ? Ibn Māsawayh, d. 243/857). There are later marginal and interlinear subject headings written in black ink. The tables usually begin at the top of a folio. The space left between the text of one section and the beginning of the table in the next has often been filled in with recipes written by a later hand using black ink (for example, folios 5a, 7a, 12a, 13a, 14a, 38a, 39b, and 101a).

f. 1 extraneous notes line 8 to bottom of f. 141v reported sayings of Galen on the 12 things a man should not deprive himself of for the preservation of good health

Language(s): Arabic

References

NCAM-1, Entry No.124B
Golius Sale Cat., Med. Qu. no. 2
GAL I 485
UAM, 143 entry DCXI (611), item 1
2. f. 141v
Incipit: قال جالينوس ينبغى للرجل ان لا يمنع نفسه عن اثنا عشر شيئا ، من البول والبزاق والريح والعطس والجشآ وشهوة الغذاه والنوم والسعال والقىء والباه والعرق ومايتحلب من الراس ، لان حبس البول يورث الحصى
Explicit: والعرق اذا حبس يسود الجسد ويهزله ، والمخاط اذا حبس ينتن فى الراس ويورث الصداع والشقيقه تمت

A short essay, attributed to Galen, on twelve things which a person should not avoid: urination, spitting, breaking wind, sneezing, belching, eating, sleeping, coughing, vomiting, sexual intercourse, perspiration, and what drips from the head (mucus). No alignment has been found with any other recorded Galenic treatise (genuine or spurious). No other copy has been identified.

The copy is unsigned and undated. The appearance of the paper, ink, and script suggests a possible dating of the seventh/thirteenth-century.

Dimensions 22.1 x 15.2 (text area 18.6 x 11.3) cm; 23 lines per page. The attribution to Galen is given in the first line. The copy appears to have been made by the same copyist, and on the same type of paper, as the other items in the volume.

There are no marginalia.

Language(s): Arabic

References

NCAM-1, Entry No.21
Golius Sale Cat., Med. Qu. no. 2
UAM, 143 entry DCXI (611); this treatise is not mentioned
3. ff. 142r-143v
Incipit: كتاب البثور. بسم الله ... هذا كتاب ابقراط الذى وجد فى قبره ترجمه يحر [= يحى] بن البطريق بلغنا انه لما حضرت ابقراط الوفاة امر ان يجعل هذه القولي المكتوبة فى هذا الكتاب فى قبره فى درج عاج
Explicit: قال ابقراط اذا كانت تحت الرقبة بثره وفى الجفن الاسفل من العين اليسرى بثرة ايضا بيضاء فاعلم ان صاحبها يموت لاحدى عشر يوما من مرضه واية ذلك انه يعرض له فى بدو مرضه شهوة الحلوا شهوة شديده . انقضى كتاب ابقراط فى تقدمه العلم الذى وجد فى قبره والحمد لله كثيرا كما هو اهله ومستحقه ومستوجبه فذلك خمسه وعشرين قضية

An Arabic translation of a Greek compilation on prognosis and the signs of death based on skin affections, arranged in twenty-five premises (qaḍīyahs). It was written in the fourth or fifth century AD in Alexandria but spuriously attributed to Hippocrates and alleged to have been found in his tomb. Yaḥyá ibn al-Biṭrīq (d. c. 210/825) translated it into Arabic, and it circulated under several different titles, including Risālah fī al-Qaḍāyā, Risālah fī ʿAlāmāt al-mawt, Risālah al-qabrīyah, al-Qaḍāyā al-Ibuqrāṭīyah al-dāllah ʿalá al-mawt, Kitāb al-durj li-Ibuqrāṭ, and Kitāb al-sirr. Its Latin translation also went under several titles, including Secreta Hippocratis, Capsula eburnea, De pustulis et apostematibus significantibus mortem, and De indiciis mortis.

The copy is unsigned and‍ undated, but appears to be possibly a copy from the seventh/thirteenth century and may be the earliest recorded copy of the treatise. It is a complete copy of the short treatise.

Dimensions 22.1 × 15.2 (text area 18.6 × 11.3) cm; 23 lines per page. The title is given as Kitāb al-Buthūr as a heading at the top of folio 142a1. At the start of the treatise (folio 142a2) the title and author are given as Kitāb Ibuqrāṭ alladhī wujida fī qabrihi, and at the end of the treatise (folio 143b7) as Kitāb Ibuqrāṭ fī taqdimat al-ʿilm alladhī wujida fi qabrihi. The translator into Arabic, Yaḥyá ibn al-Biṭrīq, is named on folio 142a2. The name Yaḥyá ibn al-Biṭrīq also occurs as the translator in the margin of Bethesda, Maryland, NLM, MS. A 84, folio 39b (see Savage-Smith, NLM). For variations on the translator’s name in other copies, see Rosa Kuhne Brabant, ‘The Arabic Prototype of the Capsula eburnea’, QSA, 5–6 (1987–8), 431−41, esp. 435−7.

The copy appears to have been made by the same copyist, and on the same type of paper, as the other items in the volume. The qaḍīyahs are marked with a red circle and the heading qāla Ibqurāṭ, except for the first qaḍīyah, which begins with qāla only. There are no catchwords.

There are no marginalia.

Language(s): Arabic

References

NCAM-1, Entry No.11A
Golius Sale Cat., Med. Qu. no. 2
GAL I 203
UAM, 143 entry DCXI (611), item 2(ii)
4. ff. 143v-145v
Incipit: يا ربّ سر لم يزل مخزونا • مكتّما عن الورى مكنونا/ فى صحف محجوبة مطويّة • مصؤنة مستورة مخفية
Explicit: فهذه جمله ما كان ذخر • من سر بقراط الحكيم واعتفر [=واعتبر]/ فاحفظه ان كنت حفيط [=حفيظا] للحكم • وانت فى الطبّ رفيع كالعلم

A didactic poem summarizing the Kitāb al-Buthūr or Risālah fī al-Qaḍāyā. The latter was written in the fourth or fifth century in Alexandria and spuriously attributed to Hippocrates. In many of the manuscript copies, the versification is attributed to Ibn Sīnā (d. 428/1037), while in one of the Bodleian copies the versification is assigned to Shams al-Dīn ibn Makkī (dates unknown).

In the versification sometimes ascribed to Avicenna, 980-1037

The copy is unsigned and undated, but appears to be possibly a manuscript of the seventh/thirteenth century. It may be the earliest recorded copy of the poem. It is a complete copy of the poem, in ninety-six couplets (bayts) in Rajaz metre. There are important differences between the text of Kuhne’s edition, which has only 94 bayts; the differences are substantial enough to suggest a different version or transmission of the text.

Dimensions 22.1 × 15.2 (text area 18.6 × 11.3) cm; 23 lines in each of two columns written within red frames. There is no title given in this copy and no attribution of the versification to Ibn Sīnā. There is a two-line heading, missing in the other recorded copies, that reads as follows (folio 143b9−10): هذا ما وجد فى صحيفة ابقراط الحكيم حين نبشه اقليس الملك واستخرجها من تابوته وقد نظمناه شعراً ليسهل حفظه على مَن اراده ان شاء الله تعلى. This is what was found on top of Hippocrates the physician when the ruler Uqlīs exhumed him and removed it from his coffin. We have put it into verse in order to make its memorizationﻫ easy for whoever desires it.

The legend that the treatise on prognostics by skin affections was found in Hippocrates’ tomb in an ivory casket (durj ʿāj) accounts for the common Latin title Capsula eburnea. For variants of the name of the discoverer of this prognostic manual in Hippocrates’ tomb, see Rosa Kuhne Brabant, ‘The Arabic Prototype of the Capsula eburnea,’ QSA, 5–6 (1987−8), 431−41, esp. 435−7.

The copy appears to have been made by the same copyist, and on the same type of paper, as the other items in the volume. Most of the vocalization has been added later.

On folio 145b, a slightly later hand has added at the bottom of the left-hand column on a therapeutic aphorism attributed to Hippocrates, and in the right-hand column a recipe.

Language(s): Arabic

References

NCAM-1, Entry No.12A
Golius Sale Cat., Med. Qu. no. 2
GAL I 203
UAM, 143 entry DCXI (611), item 2(ii); this treatise is not mentioned
5. ff. 146r-147r
Incipit: بسم الله ... كتاب مغنيس فى البول نقل ابن عثمن سعيد بن يعقوب الدمشقى ، ان اصناف البول كثيرة واول اصنافه صنفان وهما الشىء المنسكب السيال والنزول
Explicit: واما الرقيق الابيض والرقيق الاصفر والاحمر الناصع فقد ذكرنا فيما تقدم على ماذى يدلان واذ قد استكملنا صفه البول فنحن جاعلون هذا الموضع انقضا المقالة. تمت مقالة مغنيس الحمصي فى البول بنقل ابن عثمان الدمشقى الحمد لواهب العقل بلانهايه وصلواته [غير معجمة] على نبيه محمد واله اجمعين

The manuscript here catalogued contains portions of the Arabic translation made by Abū ʿUthmān Saʿīd ibn Yaʿqūb al-Dimashqī (d. after 302/914) of the Greek treatise on urine by Magnus of Emesa. The precise identity of Magnus of Emesa is uncertain, but he is possibly to be identified with a physician and teacher in Alexandria around AD 370 by the name of Magnus of Nisibis. For the Greek text on urine by Magnus, see J. L. Ideler, Physici et medici Graeci minores, 2 vols. (Berlin: G. Reimer, 1841–2), i. 307−16.

The copy is unsigned and undated, but appears to be possibly a seventh/thirteenth-century manuscript. The copy is incomplete and the leaves are not in correct order.

Dimensions 22.1 × 15.2 (text area 18.6 × 11.3) cm; 23 lines per page. The author is given as Maghnīs at the beginning of the treatise and as Maghnīs al-Ḥimsī at the end. The title is given in the first line of the treatise. The translator’s name occurs at both the opening and at the end.

Folio 146a has the letter ‘T’ in the lower corner, indicating that it is the start of a quire. The remaining folios of that quire are missing. The text continues with folio 148a, which has the letter ‘V’ in the lower corner, indicating it is the start of another quire, which appears intact through to 153b. The text concludes on folio 147a, ending with line 8 of that folio; folio 147 appears to be the last leaf in the quire labelled ‘V’.

The copy appears to have been made by the same copyist, and on the same type of paper, as the other items in the volume.

There are no marginalia nor catchwords.

*not separately mentioned by Uri

Language(s): Arabic

References

NCAM-1, Entry No.33
Appendix Medicine
UAM, 143 entry DCXI (611); this treatise is not mentioned
6.
ff. 147r-147v ff. 154r-156v
Incipit: بسم الله ... رب يسر ولا تعسر اول العلامات نبتدى باللون الاصفر اذا كان شاملا للدلالات على الصحة والمرض وبالله توفيقنا، البول الاصفر الاترجى الرقيق ، فى الحميات دال على طول المرض
Explicit: فان كان صاحبه صايم او عطشانا دل على انفراع رطوبات البدن الاصليه ويحول

A short treatise on prognosis and diagnosis from urine attributed to Galen. It does not appear to be directly related to the Greek writings of Galen concerned with urine. For three Greek tracts on the topic falsely attributed to Galen, see Galen, Opera Omnia, xix, 574−628.

The text breaks off abruptly and is immediately followed by the final leaves transcribed by the same copyist from a treatise on urine by Ishāq ibn Sulaymān al-Isrāʾīlī (d. 320/932 or 344/955). A comparison of the beginning of this treatise ascribed to Galen with the beginning of that written by al-Isrāʾīlī demonstrates that these leaves are not part of al-Isrāʾīlī’s treatise on urine (see also Dietrich, Medicina Arabica, 240).

The copy is unsigned and undated. The appearance of the paper, ink, and script suggests a possible dating of the seventh/thirteenth-century. It is an incomplete copy, with only the beginning of the treatise.

Dimensions 22.1 x 15.2 (text area 18.6 x 11.3) cm; 23 lines per page. The title, attributing the treatise to Galen, is given in large writing at the bottom of folio 147a17–18. The text breaks off at the bottom of folio 156b and is immediately followed by the final leaves transcribed by the same copyist from the treatise by Isḥāq ibn Sulaymān al-Isrāʾīlī on urine (see item number 7 of this volume).

The copy appears to have been made by the same copyist, and on the same type of paper, as the other items in the volume. The text on folios 147b and 154a is fully vocalized.

There has been some disturbance to the quires at this point in the volume. Folios 146–7 form the outside pair of conjugate leaves from a defective quire; folio 146a is labelled ‘T’, indicating the start of a quire (it is the second quire in a row to be labelled with a ‘T’). Folios 148–53 are six leaves (three pairs of conjugate leaves) from another quire labelled ‘V’ at the bottom of 148a. The lower corner of folio 154a has a label ‘X’ indicating the start of another quire; however, some disturbance must have occurred to this quire since the text on folios 157 and 158 (the centre of the quire) is clearly taken from the conclusion of a different treatise.

There are some marginal corrections. On folio 147a there are two recipes written near the title of the treatise, in the lower left and lower right corners, possibly added by the copyist or by a slightly later reader. There is also another recipe added later in the margin of folio 147a.

Language(s): Arabic

References

NCAM-1, Entry No.18
Golius Sale Cat., Med. Qu. no. 2
GAL I 236
UAM, 143 entry DCXI (611), item 2; this treatise is not mentioned, but rather included in the folios catalogued as a treatise on urine by Isḥāq ibn Sulaymān al-Isrāʾīlī
Sezgin, GAS III N5, 307−8
7. ff. 157r-158r
Incipit: وان كان كثيرًا متتابعًا من غير نحول البدن دل على فضول في البدن . في البول الكثير. اذا كان بصاحبه ثقل ووجع بالمسمّى قولون لا انه بول
Explicit: فى رغوة البول وزبده ، البول اذا كان على وجهه زبد مع الحمى الحادة دال على الصداع ، فان كان زبده كالنفاخات ولم يكن معه علامات اخر رديّة كان بولا صالحا، وان كان عليه شبيه بالعبب [= بالعنب] كان دالا على وجع الكلى . كمل اختصار اسحق بن سليمان الاسرائيلى الكتاب فى البول والحمد للحضره القدسية

This is a treatise on diagnosis and prognosis by urine, composed in ten chapters (bābs). Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿah referred to the treatise simply as Kitāb fī al-bawl (IAU, ii. 37). It also circulated under variant titles including Kitāb al-Qārūrah, Kitāb Maʿrifat al-bawl wa-aqsāmihi and Kitāb Majmūʿ min aqāwīl al-awāʾil fī maʿrifat al-bawl wa-aqāsmihi wa-dalāʾilihi. The treatise was translated into Hebrew and into Latin in versions that were quite influential. The Bodleian copy is a small fragment only.

The copy is unsigned and undated, but appears to be possibly a seventh/thirteenth-century manuscript. Only the final folio and colophon are preserved in this copy. They form the centre leaves of a quire which has been disturbed, for the preceding three leaves contain a treatise on the same subject, prognosis by urine, attributed to Galen (d. c. AD 216) and transcribed by the same copyist; for the latter, see Entry No. 18.

Dimensions 22.1 × 15.2 (text area 18.6 × 11.3) cm; 23 lines per page. The copy appears to have been made by the same copyist, and on the same type of paper, as the other items in the volume.

There are no marginalia

Language(s): Arabic

References

NCAM-1, Entry No.112
UAM, 143 entry DCXI (611) item 2, where the folios containing a pseudo-Galenic treatise on urine are included with those belonging to this treatise
8. ff. 158r-181r
Incipit: بسم الله ... قال ابو بكر محمد بن زكريا الرازى الطبيب انى ذاكر فى كتابى هذا من الادوية التى الحاجة اليها عيونها ومختاراتها وطارح كل ما كان منها فضل وتوسع فاقتصر على ما يفطر اليه حاجة الطبيب
Explicit: فى ادوية السرطان ، صفة دوا السرطان يوخذ اسفنذاج الرصاص عشره دراهم طين ارمنى ... ويذر على الموضع المتقرح من السرطان فى كل يوم ، قال ابو بكر محمد بن زكريا الرازى انى اودعت كتانى هذا من الادوية المولفه ما عالجت به من الاسقام والاعلال فانجح وبرا على يدى ولم اضن تعريف المتطببين واهل الجبر بذلك اذ كل غرضى النفع والانتفاع للخاصه والعامة . والله المحمود والمشكور تم القراباذين

This treatise presents compound remedies grouped by disease or ailment. It is arranged in sixty-two sections, beginning with those recipes useful for treating diseases of the head and ending with remedies for cancer. Al-Rāzī composed two formularies, one usually referred to as the large formulary (al-Aqrābādhīn al-kabīr) and the other as the small formulary (al-Aqrābādhīn al-ṣaghīr), both of which were translated into Latin. A number of Arabic manuscripts are preserved today with an Aqrābādhīn ascribed to al-Rāzī, but no comparison has been made of these manuscripts, which a cursory overview suggests vary greatly in their arrangement and contents. The precise title given in the Bodleian copy, Kitāb al-Aqrābādhīn al-mawsūm bi-al-dustūr, has not been found in the medieval bio-bibliographic literature nor in other catalogues of manuscript collections.

The copy is unsigned and undated, but appears to be a manuscript of the seventh/thirteenth century. It appears to be a complete copy. The treatise opens with a table of contents of its sixty-two sections, with the text itself starting with the compound remedies for ailments of the hair. The order of presentation, however, does not precisely follow that of the table of contents.

Dimensions 22.1 × 15.2 (text area 18.6 × 11.3) cm; 23 lines per page. The title and author are given on the title page (folio 158a5−7) as: كتاب الاقراباذين الموسوم بالدستور تاليف الحكيم الرئيس جالينوس الاسلام محمد بن زكريا الرازى رحمة الله عليه The author is named again at the start of the treatise and at the end.

The copy appears to have been made by the same copyist, and on the same type of paper, as the other items in the volume.

There are numerous marginal annotations, mostly recipes, in several later hands, and there are some interlinear notes. There is a Persian recipe written diagonally near the title on folio 158a.

On folio 158a8-end, beneath the title, the copyist has carefully transcribed a paragraph on ten merits of barley water (فضايل مآ الشعير وهى عشرة) which appears to be unrelated to the treatise.

Language(s): Arabic

References

NCAM-1, Entry No.189
Golius Sale Cat., Med. Qu. no. 2
GAL I 234
UAM, 143 entry DCXI [611] item 3, said to be the Antidotarium by al-Rāzī
9. ff. 181v-182r
Incipit: تجارب المارستان مما كتبه محمد بن زكريا ببغداد فى حداثته . طبيخ الزوفا يسقون لسعال اليابس والربو وعلل الصدر . فان كان البطن يابسا جعلوا فيه لب الخيار شنبر
Explicit: وان لم يستنقى العروق سقوه ما الشعير لانه لا يستحيل مرطب فى برد الاعضآ الاصليه

This is a brief, possibly fragmentary, tract presenting therapeutic procedures and drug remedies that, according to the title, al-Rāzī found successful during his youth working in the hospital in Baghdad.

The copy is unsigned and undated, but appears to be possibly from the seventh/thirteenth century. It is unclear whether or not it is a complete copy.

Dimensions 22.1 × 15.2 (text area 18.6 × 11.3) cm; 23 lines per page. The title and author are taken from the first line of text. The copy appears to have been made by the same copyist, and on the same type of paper, as the other items in the volume. This item occupies facing folios that form the centre of a quire.

On the lower part of folio 182a8-20 the copyist transcribed anonymous pharmaceutical extracts. A later hand added a recipe in two lines at the bottom.

Followed, f. 182r line 8-bottom, by an anon. pharmacological extract

**Iskandar Machriq liv., p. 171 ff.; text of MS. printed on pp. 171-73

Language(s): Arabic

References

NCAM-1, Entry No.151
Golius Sale Cat., Med. Qu. no. 2
GAL I 234-5
UAM, 143 entry DCXI (611), item 3, where the item is catalogued as part of an Antidotarium by al-Rāzī
10. ff. 182v-226v
Incipit: بسم الله ... الحمد لله رب العالمين والصلوة على خير خلقه محمد واله الطاهرين هذا اقراباذين منتزع من عدّة اقراباذينات تلخيص الشيخ الاجل امين الدوله ابى العلا صاعد بن التلميذ للبيمارستان العضدى رحمة الله عليه . فهرست ابواب الكتاب ، ا فى الاقراصات ، ب فى الحبوبات
Explicit: ... الباب الثامن عشر فى ادوية الرعاف يغسل اولا المنخرين بخل خمر جيّد ... سعوط يقطع الرعاف قرطاس محرق واقاتيا [واقاقيا ؟] وشب وافيون مصرى [مضرى ؟] ورامك العفص وكافور من كل واحد

In one of the two abrigded versions [Talkhīṣ] for use in the ʻAḍudī hospital, [Incomplete; lacking most of the 18th and all of the 19th and 20th bābs.]

According to the introduction, this formulary was based upon a number of earlier formularies, abridged by Ibn al-Tilmīdh for use in the ʿAḍudī hospital in Baghdad. This information is provided in the subtitle as mumtazaʿ min ʿiddat al-aqrābādhīnāt talkhīṣ lil-bīmāristān al-ʿaḍūdī. The treatise is comprised of twenty chapters (bābs).

The copy is unsigned and undated, but appears to be a product of the seventh/thirteenth century. The copy may have been made by the same copyist, and on the same type of paper, as the other items in the volume. It is an incomplete copy of the formulary, with the text breaking off abruptly shortly after the start of the eighteenth chapter (bāb) and with recipes missing when compared with other copies.

Dimensions 22.1 × 15.2 (text area 18.6 × 11.3) cm; 23 lines per page. The title is given simply as Aqrābādhīn at the start of the treatise, along with the auhor’s name as Amīn al-Dawlah Abū al-ʿAlāʾ Ṣāʿid ibn Tilmīdh. In the margin, before the word al-Tilmīdh, a slightly later hand has added: Hibat Allāh ibn Ibrāhīm al-maʿrūf bi-.

A later hand has written over the headings with red ink and filled in the circular text-breaks with red ink. A yet different hand has added blue overlinings and headings in blue ink (some gold sprinked). A later hand has made marginal corrections and added some vocalization. A much later hand has made casual subject notations in some of the margins.

f. 227 extraneous notes

Language(s): Arabic

References

NCAM-1, Entry No.210
Golius Sale Cat., Med. Qu. no. 2
GAL I 488
UAM, 143 entry DCXI (611); this treatise is not mentioned

Physical Description

Form: codex
140 ff. 1 f. 2 ff. 3 ff. 8 ff. 4 ff. 2 ff. 24 ff. 2 ff. 45 ff.

Condition

The paper is water-stained and heavily soiled through thumbing, with slight traces of worm-eating; the water damage on folios 56−7 is severe. The edges have been trimmed from their original size, with some loss of marginalia, though the present condition of the edges is frayed and worn. The preliminary folio i, and folios 1, 226 are guarded. The edges of preliminary folio i and folios 4−6 and 227 have been repaired. On folio 64a a strip of paper has been pasted over the lower quarter, on which two recipes have been written in a later hand. The middle section of folio 51a has been obliterated.

Hand(s)

The text area has been frame-ruled, but the copyist does not always adhere to the ruling. The text is written in a medium-large, careful, consistent Naskh with most of the diacritical dots and occasional vocalization (some added later). The letters ḥāʾ and ʿayn occasionally have minuscule letters under them. It is written in brown to light-brown ink, with headings in red and brown and text breaks of red dots outlined in brown; end of letters are sometimes highlighted in red. Overlinings were added later in ink that now has a silvery cast. The tables are framed in two lines of red ink.

Additions:
  • Paper The lightly glossed, sometimes matt, beige paper has a thickness of 2.1−2.5 mm and an opaqueness factor of 4. It is slightly fibrous, with rather indistinct, vertical, slightly sagging, laid lines and no chain lines (although on some folios there are traces of indistinct, irregular chain lines).

Binding

The volume is bound in a nineteenth-century European library binding of tan leather with blind frames, with modern paper pastedowns and endpapers.

History

Origin: ?13th cent. CE ?13th cent. CE ?13th cent. CE ?13th cent. CE ?13th cent. CE ?13th cent. CE ?13th cent. CE ?13th cent. CE ?13th cent. CE ?13th cent. CE

Provenance and Acquisition

The volume is from the private collection of Jacob Golius (d. 1667) who acquired manuscripts in the 1620s (mostly in Syria). The manuscript was purchased in 1696 by Narcissus Marsh, Archbishop of Armagh.

Bequeathed to the Bodleian by Narcissus Marsh, Archbishop of Armagh, upon his death in 1713.

Record Sources

Manuscript description based on Emilie Savage-Smith; A New Catalogue of Arabic Manuscripts in The Bodleian Library, University of Oxford. Volume I: Medicine, Oxford: OUP, 2011

Availability

Entry to read in the Library is permitted only on presentation of a valid reader's card (for admissions procedures contact Bodleian Admissions). Contact specialcollections.enquiries@bodleian.ox.ac.uk for further information on the availability of this manuscript

Funding of Cataloguing

JISC

Subjects


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